Eric Jacobus and fellow Bay Area indie filmmaker Darren Holmquist kick it in slow motion in Grave Error.

A bearded dude brings a shovel to your master’s grave. What would you do?

Kick each other! Obviously. The imagery is beautiful thanks to the camerawork and color editing of Huy Vu. Also special thanks must be given to the good people at Skylawn Funeral Home. Enjoy the punchline at the end too… though I suppose it should be called a “kickline” instead.

Michael Chance helmed this dystopian scifi action thriller Whipping Boy which features Eric Jacobus and fellow Stunt People members Lucas Okuma and Ashley Short in a 2 on 1 fight scene against actor Tongayi Chirisa. Here’s hoping Mr. Chance can score a much bigger budget in his next film, because he has some serious potential. Check it out below.

Eric uses Google Glass to learn to defend himself against a Terminator from the future, who’s set on killing him before he can become President of the United States. Sound far-fetched? Not so fast…

Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe from The Young Masters came out to the West Coast and we teamed up to create Future Boss. With Shaun Finney behind the camera we decided to do a callback to the style of mid-80s Hong Kong action cinema, where we minimized camera movement, used editing generously, and choreographed pretty linearly. We did takes until we eliminated any mess in our moves and stuck to using the best angle for every move. If a move in the sequence wasn’t just right for the angle, we’d usually just cut to the next angle. While I was at it I came up with a shorthand term for this style – “no mess“.

We shot everything at the Embarcadero in San Francisco, where security tends to be notoriously strict but for some reason found no reason to bother us. We shot most of it on the trusty Sony NEX-FS100 and the first-person stuff on the GoPro Hero3 Black. Lorenz says we shot it for 4 nights but I seem to remember it taking 5. Each night was cold and sometimes wet, and Lorenz got sick in the middle of it but pushed through for about 3 hours a night, totaling (by my memory) 15 hours of filming.

A Stunt People and Young Masters co-production.

President – Eric Jacobus
Terminator – Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe
Tutorial Guy – Felix Fukuyoshi Ruwwe
Bum – Shaun Finney

Choreography – Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe & Eric Jacobus
Cinematographer – Shaun Finney
Directed, Edited, and VFX by Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe
Written and Produced by Eric Jacobus

Check out The Young Masters at http://www.youtube.com/user/youngmasters

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Earlier this month I went to North Carolina to film for Mario Warfare, which is directed by Micah Moore, the man behind Dogs of Chinatown and Beat Down Boogie. His main man of action Matt Sumner is in the role of Mario from Super Mario Brothers, and Micah has turned the narrative into a brothers-in-arms spoof, where Mario and Luigi are still plumbers, but they happen to pack a lot of heat wherever they go. Lots of good mash-ups await people who subscribe and keep up on the Mario Warfare, and yours truly took on the role of “Waluigi”, an evil version of the Luigi character, who goes toe to toe with Mario in a pipe-laden industrial complex.

Check out the video below to see a segment of the fight between Mario and Waluigi.

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After we spent a week at 87eleven, Alvin Hsing and I came away with this video to show what came of our efforts – a pre-viz (choroegraphed and shot rough version) for the final knife fight in A Good Day to Die Hard (that’s Die Hard #5). The scene called for McClane to face off against the film’s villain Alik on a rooftop, with Alik wielding a knife and using some combination of Krav Maga and some basic Silat. McClane is, of course, limited to his wits and left-handed haymakers, which was a lot of fun. Lock an artist in a room and he’ll build a city.

I play John McClane fighting the Alik character, played by Alvin. It’s an American-style fight with some Hong Kong flare, but done in a way to 1. take advantage of the fact that Willis is left-handed and 2. not overload the producers with “shoe leather”, or excessive martial artsy stuff. You know, that straight, industrial-grade action that we all drink by the gallon, the side effect being that we now require it on a daily basis.

But perhaps it was still too much, as the fight never made it into the film. I can’t say whether it was filmed and subsequently edited out, but judging by the structure of the finale of A Good Day it’s apparent that they never shot it at all.

So maybe we will.

All in all it was a huge joy primarily to work with JJ Perry in crafting the scene, with Chad Stahelski nearby. They would tell us when we were taking it too far in certain directions, since these guys know producers from an action standpoint like nobody else. We had some fun ideas that were just too Hong Kong-y, like a flying headbutt that was tied off so my body would stop mid-air when the contact line was hit, as well as a LOT more shoe leather. I love that stuff. Also working with Jeremy Marinas, who aside from being of the world’s best trickers is also a hell of a photographer, was straightforward and fun since we both knew the best angles for action, which tended to be the same. The Natural Law of Action shines through.

The Gold Rush