Eric uses Google Glass to learn to defend himself against a Terminator from the future, who’s set on killing him before he can become President of the United States. Sound far-fetched? Not so fast…

Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe from The Young Masters came out to the West Coast and we teamed up to create Future Boss. With Shaun Finney behind the camera we decided to do a callback to the style of mid-80s Hong Kong action cinema, where we minimized camera movement, used editing generously, and choreographed pretty linearly. We did takes until we eliminated any mess in our moves and stuck to using the best angle for every move. If a move in the sequence wasn’t just right for the angle, we’d usually just cut to the next angle. While I was at it I came up with a shorthand term for this style – “no mess“.

We shot everything at the Embarcadero in San Francisco, where security tends to be notoriously strict but for some reason found no reason to bother us. We shot most of it on the trusty Sony NEX-FS100 and the first-person stuff on the GoPro Hero3 Black. Lorenz says we shot it for 4 nights but I seem to remember it taking 5. Each night was cold and sometimes wet, and Lorenz got sick in the middle of it but pushed through for about 3 hours a night, totaling (by my memory) 15 hours of filming.

A Stunt People and Young Masters co-production.

President – Eric Jacobus
Terminator – Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe
Tutorial Guy – Felix Fukuyoshi Ruwwe
Bum – Shaun Finney

Choreography – Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe & Eric Jacobus
Cinematographer – Shaun Finney
Directed, Edited, and VFX by Lorenz Hideyoshi Ruwwe
Written and Produced by Eric Jacobus

Check out The Young Masters at http://www.youtube.com/user/youngmasters

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TheTerminatorGb310311The Terminator searched for Sarah Connor’s address in a phonebook. Somehow he didn’t have a photo of her nor knew what she looked like. A mistake like this would not pass today, but did this bother anyone in 1984? I don’t think it did. Photos weren’t very important then – we took a few of them, they wore out, and we threw them away. We felt fine relying on personal memory or stories to recall information, so we comfortable forgetting things and letting them die. As I was watching The Terminator tonight, I remembered thinking this way too, and how long it’s been since I thought that way.

Technological innovation has allowed us to resist human forgetfulness and death. We take millions of photos, keep our files forever, and we seem convinced that immortality is not only possible, but that it’s a moral imperative. Cameron imagined a future where even robots let memories die, which is a window into seeing how people thought in 1984. Show this film to your children and grandchildren.